December 27, 1982

COVER

The comic triumph of SCTV

BUSINESS

The bankers and their crisis

MEDIA

A long, slow squeeze in the newsrooms

The comic triumph of SCTV 2829
COVER

The comic triumph of SCTV

It was the night before Christmas, and all through Melonville not a creature was stirring—not even fat Johnny LaRue. LaRue had passed out in the snow after sucking down a gallon of Canadian Club while searching for Santa. Back at Melonville’s television studio, even Libby Wolfson, the host of the You're So Beautiful show, had left for home with her guest Sue Bop(stein)-Simpson, with whom she had been discussing “what Hanukkah means to us.”
The bankers and their crisis 2021
BUSINESS

The bankers and their crisis

The president of First Boston Corporation, PedroPablo Kuczynski, starkly calls it “the end of the music.” Former French prime minister Raymond Barre detects a “general mood of uncertainty and pessimism.” Willy Brandt, head of the commission on North-South issues, warned in Ottawa that economic and financial catastrophes loom unless emergency measures are taken.
A long, slow squeeze in the newsrooms 3839
MEDIA

A long, slow squeeze in the newsrooms

Until last week, staff cutbacks sweeping through the nation’s newspaper editorial offices have, for the most part, been a quiet affair. The dismissals, slimmed-down editions and vanishing freelance contributors have not sparked the same sort of outcry that followed the dramatic 1980 closings of the Ottawa Journal and The Winnipeg Tribune.
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

Hugh Hambleton is a traitor to his country and a repulsive human being. He should spend the rest of his miserable life in prison doing hard labor! But instead he gets a big color portrait on the cover of Maclean's, as if he were some kind of national hero (The Hambleton Spy Web, Cover, Dec. 13).
Facing up to visions of 1930 89
CANADA

Facing up to visions of 1930

In startling contrast to the usual hurly-burly of federal-provincial relations, the meeting last week ended on a surprising note: Canada’s 11 ministers of finance agreed to co-operate. The rare show of unity was itself a grim acknowledgment that the nation has plunged into an economic crisis rivalling the Great Depression.
Walesa’s joyless ride 1415
WORLD

Walesa’s joyless ride

The operation was carried out with ruthless military precision. Truckloads of the grey-uniformed, stick-wielding ZOMO riot police blocked approaches to the gaunt Three Crosses monument commemorating the scores of martyrs in the 1970 Gdansk shipyard uprising.
Who said Canada was dull? 67
COLUMN

Who said Canada was dull?

"The notion that it is boring mainly reflects simple ignorance about the world's second-largest country.” —The Economist The revered British weekly produced that assessment back in March. Canada, in 1982, has shown just how right it was.
Progress amid the acrimony 1011
CANADA

Progress amid the acrimony

In a winter when surging unemployment and plunging production have given painful new meaning to the phrase “record-breaking,” Parliament has quietly broken a record of its own. The current session had chalked up an unprecedented 434 days as MPs prepared to flee the capital this week for their 25-day Christmas recess.
It’s the weight of the wallet 2627
COLUMN

It’s the weight of the wallet

There are only tiny pockets of evidence that word of an economic decline in the real world has seeped through to the golden pond of sports. The Pittsburgh Penguins, a not irresistible hockey team, played to a 4-4 tie with Detroit the other night before 7,015 dozing patrons, less than half the rink’s capacity.
The elusive quest for peace 1617
WORLD

The elusive quest for peace

The statement was tantalizingly vague. After two days of talks last week, two key parties in the search for a Middle East settlement, Jordan and the Palestine Liberation Organization, agreed in a communiqué “to recover Arab and Palestinian rights in the light of a joint conception of a special and distinctive relationship between Jordan and a liberated Palestine.”
December 201982 January 31983