March 14, 1983

Her Enduring Majesty 2829
COVER

Her Enduring Majesty

As one of the worst storms in living memory battered the California coast last week, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness Prince Philip were forced to forsake the royal yacht—their home during a month-long tour of the Americas—for safer modes of travel.
OPEC’s ordeal and Canada’s dilemma 3637
BUSINESS

OPEC’s ordeal and Canada’s dilemma

Canadian governments are now extracting more profit from a barrel of oil than most OPEC nations. And that fact alone explained Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s ambivalent attitude last week about the possibility of cutting petroleum prices.
Designing a stylish recovery in Detroit 4445
DESIGN

Designing a stylish recovery in Detroit

They are low to the ground, and their aerodynamic contours are as rounded as a missile’s. Their front ends sweep back in an uninterrupted flow. The traditional chrome and other decoration have been stripped away. Inside, bracketing the steering wheel, there is a curve of glowing circuitry that constantly reads the machine’s health and reports with a soothing electronic voice if a door is left ajar.
A premier goes to Paris 1415
CANADA

A premier goes to Paris

The signature in the guest book was modest in the extreme. “Bill Davis, Brampton,” it read. If the folksy scrawl failed to match the hoopla surrounding the premier’s official unveiling of Ontario’s glittering, million-dollar presence on Paris’ rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré last week, it did nothing to still a controversy over what lies in a name.
Ottawa rewires the TV world 1617
CANADA

Ottawa rewires the TV world

Winnipeg satellite receiver manufacturer Paul Naaykens was elated when Ottawa revealed a new broadcasting policy that effectively proclaimed freedom for the airwaves last week. He erected a huge sign on his front lawn proclaiming the good news from Ottawa: IT’S LEGAL! Naaykens’ elation had to do with a turnabout decision last week by Communications Minister Francis Fox that the federal government had abandoned the fight against television dish antennas as part of a policy change.
The dangers of blind flirtation 9B9
COLUMN

The dangers of blind flirtation

A dinner with a distinguished media magnate in Toronto a couple of years ago came to a sticky conclusion when criticism of Progressive Conservative party Leader Joe Clark—the magnate’s political pinup—led to the exit of the host, pulling his reluctant wife behind him.
A hunt for heroic treasures 5253
ART

A hunt for heroic treasures

If a hard sell really could perform the miracles attributed to it, then the corroded marble image of the boy-king and conqueror Alexander the Great would by now be as permanently imprinted on the North American brain as the glittering mask of Tutankhamen.
Counting up the miseries 1011
CANADA

Counting up the miseries

It is an unsettling portrait of a nation. The Canada that emerges from the 1981 census is a land of shrinking opportunities and disintegrating dreams. The best-educated generation this country has ever produced now faces the most severe unemployment since the Great Depression.
The sun sets on Bay Street 4041
BUSINESS WATCH

The sun sets on Bay Street

Canadian capitalism is about to lose the symbol of its power. Bay Street is no more. In eight weeks the Toronto Stock Exchange will move to spanking new quarters inside an anonymous office tower that doesn’t even have a proper address. Throughout modern Canadian history, farmers, Social Crediters, prospectors and hard-shell Baptists have condemned “Bay Street” as a synonym for greed, while its defenders praised it as the mecca of Canada’s free-enterprise system.
Willing victims 45
LETTERS

Willing victims

I am amazed at your article about David Cronenberg (A Vivid Obsession With Sex and Death, Films, Feb. 14) and your review of his movie Videodrome. I went to see it myself and I watched nude women shackled and whipped by men in leather masks. I saw the heroine burn her own breast with a lighted cigarette to get herself into the mood.
The pontiff’s turbulent pilgrimage 1819
WORLD

The pontiff’s turbulent pilgrimage

At Rome’s Leonardo Da Vinci Airport last week, Pope John Paul II was about to board an Alitalia Airlines DC-10 for his trip to warring Central America. About the same time, on U.S. Air Force One, a senior White House official accompanying President Ronald Reagan to California announced an overall review of U.S. policy toward the region’s powder keg, El Salvador.
March 71983 March 211983