May 9, 1983

COVER

THE WAR ON STROKES

DATELINE

On the brink of calamity

WORLD

Doubts about Hitler’s words

THE WAR ON STROKES 4849
COVER

THE WAR ON STROKES

On Oct. 18 John P. Robarts, the aristocratic former premier of Ontario and a politician of national standing, walked into the bathroom of his Toronto home, put a shotgun to his head and killed himself. Robarts was 65 and he had been recovering, slowly, from a series of strokes that he suffered a year earlier.
On the brink of calamity 89
DATELINE

On the brink of calamity

Last September, as the band played on the White House lawn and the artillery coughed 21 times, U.S. President Ronald Reagan declared that Ferdinand Marcos, strongman president of the Philippines, was a “friend and ally” who deserved U.S. support.
Doubts about Hitler’s words 3031
WORLD

Doubts about Hitler’s words

For a few heady days it seemed like a historian’s dream come true. Thirty-eight years after Adolf Hitler’s death in his Berlin bunker, the mass-circulation West German weekly Stern claimed to have unearthed the Nazi dictator’s diaries. It mattered little that their existence had been hitherto unsuspected or that sample entries published in The Sunday Times of London showed a preoccupation with mundane self-justification.
Hard going on two fronts 2223
WORLD

Hard going on two fronts

Hard pressed at home and abroad, the Reagan administration moved last week to salvage two key elements of its controversial foreign policy. In Washington President Ronald Reagan went before Congress to plead for a bipartisan approach to crisis-torn Central America.
Explaining the Black decision 3435
BUSINESS

Explaining the Black decision

Only parently days after put to the rest, matter the was Conrad apBlack case returned to life last week in the Ontario legislature. And two of Ontario’s most prominent cabinet ministers—Attorney General Roy McMurtry and Consumer and Commercial Relations Minister Robert Elgie— exchanged testy statements over the disposition of the case.
Coloring the feminists red 12d13
COLUMN

Coloring the feminists red

She has an MBA, a middle-management job, and her mid-high-heel pumps are a neat accompaniment to the tailored suit softened with a burgundy silk blouse. She is president of the local riding association and expects to run for elected office herself.
The Recessive Convertible Party 6869
COLUMN

The Recessive Convertible Party

We struggled out of the Winnipeg abattoir 13 long weeks ago, the Tory beast bleeding from all pores, ravaged and perspiring, a pitiful prospect to the eyes. We have struggled across the church basements of the land, plucking wine-soaked derelicts where we can find them, recruiting button-eyed nine-year-olds into the democratic process, packing nomination meetings with bewildered immigrants just off the boat who can’t read, write or recognize John Crosbie in a game of blindman’s buff.
Programmed to please 1415
CANADA

Programmed to please

The White House luncheon had ended, and the Canadian and U.S. delegations quickly huddled to compare notes and to decide what to feed waiting reporters. At last, agreement reached, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau turned to his host and said, “Well, Mr. President, are we programmed?”
Bottom lines in the boardroom 3637
BUSINESS WATCH

Bottom lines in the boardroom

Marc Lalonde at least broke the cycle. Every new finance minister since Walter Gordon has blundered so badly that he has managed to make his predecessor look good. But nothing in Lalonde’s first budget came even close to the Keystone Kops absurdity of Allan MacEachen’s repeated pratfalls.
Davis faces the big decision 1617
CANADA

Davis faces the big decision

Whatever Ontario Premier William Davis decides about his political future this month, he has already established himself as one of the most calculating flirts in Canadian politics. For weeks panting aides and frantic reporters have pursued the phlegmatic—but welcoming—premier.
May 21983 May 161983