July 4, 1983

Tales of five vibrant cities in transition 2627
COVER

Tales of five vibrant cities in transition

Vancouver indulges itself with not one but two Polar Bear swims each year. More than 2,000 swimmers take the traditional Jan. 1 splash in the frigid waters of English Bay. Fifteen days later Ukrainian Canadians, celebrating the New Year according to the Julian calendar, do the same.
The rise of a bilingual Canadian elite 2223
COVER

The rise of a bilingual Canadian elite

John Crosbie declared during his unsuccessful quest for the federal Conservative leadership that 3.7 million bilingual Canadians should not consider themselves “some sort of aristocracy” from which all future prime ministers will be drawn.
From old country to a new mosaic 2021
COVER

From old country to a new mosaic

When Irshad Khan, an engineer, arrived in Calgary 29 years ago, he was the first East Indian in the city. At least that is how it seemed to him. “There just weren’t any others,” he says. “It was a small Canadian city at the end of the world. I mingled with the Canadians, and they accepted me.”
THE WAY WE ARE 1819
COVER

THE WAY WE ARE

On July 1, formerly Dominion Day, 24,343,181 Canadians mark their first official Canada Day. The legislation to sever another strand in Canada’s colonial connection with Britain was passed by the Senate last October after an emotional debate.
Driving home the moral of the story 5051
BOOKS

Driving home the moral of the story

If the new crop of fiction from Canadian publishers is any indication, young adults would be better off seeking their summer escape in comic books and videogame parlors. While smaller children can still find fantasy land between the covers of a book and adults can forget their troubles by burying themselves in romance and detective novels, young adults seem fated to keep their noses to the grindstone of growing up.
The politics of pot 67
FOLLOW-UP

The politics of pot

It has been 10 years since the Le Dain royal commission on the nonmedical use of drugs released its final report. The $4.5-million study, which took more than four years, remains one of the most comprehensive accounts of drug use—and abuse—in the world.
Six-and-Five stays alive 1011
CANADA

Six-and-Five stays alive

For weeks Finance Minister Marc Lalonde had been dropping hints that he had more than champagne and fine speeches in mind for this week’s first anniversary of the government’s Six-and-Five restraint program. As he submitted his plans to cabinet this week, however, the rumors became a certainty.
Controlling the Hula-Hoops 8d9
COLUMN

Controlling the Hula-Hoops

There is now no area of human activity that is beyond legislation or regulation. This attitude is the major disease of our times, and beside it—in the lens of history and for those who value a decent and free society— the problems of acid rain, crime or original sin will rate as mere kindergarten concerns.
The search for a Democratic leader 3637
WORLD

The search for a Democratic leader

Whether or not former vicepresident Walter Mondale wins the 1984 Democratic presidential nomination, he may well cite the past month as a critical turning point. Although the 55-year-old Minnesotan remains the clear front-runner, the political skirmishes of recent weeks have eroded his lead and raised serious questions about his electability.
The Canadian opening to Japan 4243
BUSINESS WATCH

The Canadian opening to Japan

The next Japanese export to hit these undefended shores will be money. Japan stopped being a net importer of capital three years ago; its financiers are now hunting for hospitable havens in which to reinvest their burgeoning profits. Canada is on the short list.
June 271983 July 111983