July 18, 1983

The recovery takes shape 2829
COVER

The recovery takes shape

The meeting was hastily planned, poorly attended and, as most participants agreed, amounted to a simple exercise in public posturing. When federal Finance Minister Marc Lalonde gathered with his provincial counterparts—or their stand-ins—for a one-day meeting on the economy in Montreal last week, little of substance was discussed.
Ottawa’s cautious competition bill 3637
BUSINESS

Ottawa’s cautious competition bill

The timing could hardly be more appropriate. With the federal government expected to introduce its long-awaited competition bill next fall, a recent rash of corporate mergers threatens to reduce further the ever-dwindling level of competition in the Canadian marketplace.
Exercising the politics of restraint 3233
COVER

Exercising the politics of restraint

Restraint. In political and economic circles throughout the Western world, it has become the new buzzword of the 1980s. Margaret Thatcher’s resounding victory at the polls in Britain last month flowed out of a resolute program of restraint.
Washington wakes up to acid rain 4041
ENVIRONMENT

Washington wakes up to acid rain

Working furiously to meet an Aug. 1 deadline, staff members at the United States Environmental Protection Agency in Washington are preparing what one official there terms “the last word” on acid rain and what the Americans should do about it.
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

Bravo to Maclean’s for its fine coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to Poland (The Pope’s Polish odyssey, World, June 27). Almost every other news medium has insisted on reading all sorts of things into the Pope’s remarks. That is why the Maclean’s report on the Pope’s visit was a refreshing, honest change.
Would you believe, Six-and-Four? 89
COLUMN

Would you believe, Six-and-Four?

There was much to celebrate, much to ponder as the cabinet met to consider Phase 2 of its master plan for Canadian economic recovery. Actually, this was Phase 2 of Phase 8 of an earlier program for economic recovery, but no one in the cabinet had been there long enough to remember.
The debate over U.S. education heats up 4243
EDUCATION

The debate over U.S. education heats up

In Nashville it was merit pay for teachers. In Shawnee, Kan., it was federal interference in a state jurisdiction. And last week in Los Angeles, it was the need to strengthen school curricula. For the past month President Ronald Reagan has delivered more speeches on education than he has on the crisis in Central America or on any other topic.
Female terror at the terminal 4445
COMPUTERS

Female terror at the terminal

This scenario, a quick sketch of the hit movie WarGames, reflects the reality of adolescent roles more accurately than Canadians might assume. At home, at school and even at camp, the revolution in computer education appears to be encoded with old-fashioned sexual stereotypes.
A frail leader talks tough 1819
WORLD

A frail leader talks tough

It was, by all accounts, a blunt exchange. On one side of the Kremlin meeting room West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl explained why his country would begin deployment of new theatre nuclear weapons in December if arms control talks in Geneva fail to produce an accord.
Poor Toronto, the last to know 5657
COLUMN

Poor Toronto, the last to know

The most pitiful thing in the world to see is a city that is embarrassed. Wounded civic pride is painful to behold. Chagrined city fathers gnash their teeth and rend their bosoms in public, issuing little bleats of guilt, filling the gutters with their tears.
July 111983 July 251983