July 25, 1983

The nation’s new agony over abortion 3233
COVER

The nation’s new agony over abortion

In Winnipeg, where abortionist Dr. Henry Morgentaler faced criminal charges last week, the protesters’ signs for and against abortion were explicit. “Keep your laws off my body,” said one. Responded another: “Baby butcher go home.”
The rough road to rearmament 2021
WORLD

The rough road to rearmament

The headquarters of Japan’s Self Defense Agency—the world’s eighth most powerful military machine—is housed in a nondescript building in Tokyo’s Roppongi district. Among the chic boutiques, it looks unwarlike, an impression heightened by the appearance and bearing of its occupants: the visitor feels he has blundered into a convention of small-town optometrists.
Stop signs and detours in the way of abortion 3637
COVER

Stop signs and detours in the way of abortion

Brandon, Man. (population 40,000), has one hospital, Brandon General, and it has a committee that, under Canadian law, can authorize abortions. Dr. Deoram Chaudhari routinely performed abortions there for 10 years, usually using a local anesthetic.
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

I would like to congratulate the editorial and writing, team for the excellent job of bringing the Canadian census to life for your readers (The way we are, Cover, July 4). It is a pity that the article From old country to new mosaic was marred by some erroneous figures.
Bennett girds for a grinding battle 1011
CANADA

Bennett girds for a grinding battle

Ross Fedy was relaxing at his home on Sunday morning when the sharp edge of the B.C. government’s radical new restraint program suddenly cost him his job. First, Fedy, 32, opened the door to a government agent who handed him a letter firing him from a five-year career as an investigations officer with the Terrace office of the provincial human rights branch.
The matter of the Reagan mole 5657
COLUMN

The matter of the Reagan mole

They will never catch Ronald Reagan with a smoking gun as they did Richard Nixon. They might as well stop trying. It is just too much to expect that Reagan, who can hardly bear to look at his own briefing books, would muster enough industry and curiosity to read Jimmy Carter’s.
A ticket to a boring Sally Ride 89
COLUMN

A ticket to a boring Sally Ride

Before we spoiled things, outer space was a fascinating idea. American children would lie awake at night imagining how neat it would be to glide through the galaxies, fighting for truth and justice on this planet or that, romancing cosmic gods and goddesses and then rocketing away for further adventure and new conquests in the name of virtue and right.
Ottawa preserves the Ostry mystery 2627
BUSINESS

Ottawa preserves the Ostry mystery

For a forecaster charged with charting the future of the Western world’s economies, the situation could hardly have been more embarrassing. Presiding over her final press conference as chief economist for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris last week, Sylvia Ostry was characteristically frank on every question but one: the mystery in which she has been forced to wrap her own future.
Fishing for wealth in the oil pool 3031
BUSINESS WATCH

Fishing for wealth in the oil pool

Brian Peckford may not be doing much for the business future of Newfoundland—but he has created a minor economic miracle in Nova Scotia. The goofie Newfie’s eagerness to self-destruct has settled, once and for all, the issue about which Atlantic port will become the centre of the oil and natural gas play that, within a decade, could be larger than the North Sea.
A Liberal lesson in strategy 1213
CANADA

A Liberal lesson in strategy

Squinting into the late-afternoon sunshine, John Roberts faced the press last week with summery nonchalance. “When I come out, it’s generally because there’s not anything of tremendous specific importance,” the environment minister said after a seven-hour cabinet meeting at the government-owned Meech Lake lodge in the Gatineau Hills.
July 181983 August 11983