November 21, 1983

THE ‘MERCY’ KILLERS 2425
COVER

THE ‘MERCY’ KILLERS

For 16 fitful hours after her birth, Candace Taschuk struggled for life in Edmonton’s University Hospital, then died in her mother’s arms on Oct. 8, 1982. Two weeks ago the Alberta attorney general’s department charged a 36-year-old Israeli doctor, Nachum Gal, with capital murder in connection with her death.
The fight to succeed Arafat 3233
WORLD

The fight to succeed Arafat

In the aftermath of Arab suicide bombings on U.S., French and Israeli targets in Lebanon, all sides seemed to be gearing up last week for a major escalation in the fighting. Syria called up 100,000 reserves, bringing its military strength to 350,000.
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

Maclean’s is to be congratulated for its critical editorial comments on the U.S. invasion of Grenada (Reagan’s new risks, From the editor’s desk, Nov. 7). This invasion was conducted with the flimsy excuse that it was needed to ensure the safety of U.S. citizens, although they had already been promised safe conduct from the country and in fact it increased the possibility of danger to them.
British Columbia divided 1819
CANADA

British Columbia divided

British Columbia was a province bitterly and profoundly divided last week. When Premier William Bennett brought down his controversial legislative program on July 7, he defended it in the name of restraint. Then, when British Columbia’s powerful trade unions examined the new laws, they concluded that the package was Bennett’s revenge for victories they had won in the past.
The inequities of restraint 4243
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

The inequities of restraint

It was presented by Ontario Treasurer Larry Grossman as a conciliatory gesture in the province’s war against inflation. In announcing a softened provincial restraint program last week, Grossman said that 72 of the province’s lowest-paid hospital workers at Sensenbrenner Hospital in Kapuskasing might now be able to avoid wage rollbacks varying from $750 to $1,000.
Amway cracks—and pays 4445
BUSINESS

Amway cracks—and pays

When Canadian government officials first charged that U.S.-based Amway Corp. had perpetrated a massive fraud against Canada Customs, the directsales soap king fought back with an almost religious zeal. Advertisements proclaiming the company’s innocence flooded North American newspapers, Amway accused Canada of trying to start a trade war with the United States and the firm’s two owners declared that they would never face the Canadian courts because they would be denied a fair trial.
A troubled nation under economic siege 89
DATELINE: BRAZIL

A troubled nation under economic siege

After 15 years of working for a São Paulo home appliance manufacturer, pattern maker Waldomio Vesco, 46, lost his $750 (U.S.)-a-month job in March when the company curtailed its operations. Since he could not find work at a comparable salary, in May Vesco opened a small general store selling food and household goods in Villa Espanhola, a working-class suburb of São Paulo.
Freedom of choice is immoral T417
COLUMN

Freedom of choice is immoral

Last week was a fun time in Eastern Canada for those issue-oriented people with the enviable ability to think in black-and-white terms, free from the burden of moral sensibilities. Like femlibber Gloria Steinem and soul mate Flo Kennedy.
Embracing Luther’s Catholicism 4849
RELIGION

Embracing Luther’s Catholicism

When Lutherans across Canada joined in special prayer services, banquets and festivals last week, they celebrated more than the 500th anniversary of the birth of their founder. They were also acknowledging a historic rapprochement.
When the Gotliebs entertain 7273
COLUMN

When the Gotliebs entertain

Marshall McLuhan and John Kenneth Galbraith have been described as the two most famous Canadians the United States has ever produced. The assumption, as always, is that a Canuck is a dull Canuck until he can be injected with some Yankee verve.
November 141983 November 281983