November 28, 1983

JOHN KENNEDY THEN AND NOW 1819
COVER

JOHN KENNEDY THEN AND NOW

There were warnings. Nothing of substance, simply the deep misgivings of men and women who had felt the heat waves of political hatred coursing through Texas in the fall of 1963. President John F. Kennedy wanted strong civil rights legislation for blacks and rapprochement with the Soviets, and to many conservative Texans in 1963 those were indefensible objectives.
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

In a Nov. 21 article, The ‘Mercy' Killers, Maclean's should have included the facts that Vancouver neurosurgeon Patrick Murray recommended to Stephen Dawson’s parents that the boy should have a life-saving operation and that he offered to perform the operation himself.
War and a little peace for Christmas 5455
CONSUMERISM

War and a little peace for Christmas

On a busy Saturday in a downtown toyland, a group of cooing girls fondled chubby “Cabbage Patch” dolls, the lavishly successful $25 cloth toys that come complete with adoption papers. Across the aisle a crowd of noisy boys waged war with an equally popular but more sombre doll, GI Joe.
Newfoundland’s fight for respectability 1213
Q&A: BRIAN PECKFORD

Newfoundland’s fight for respectability

Maclean’s: Is last month's formation of a separatist party—the Party for an Independent Newfoundland—romantic melodrama or is there more to it? Peckford: I would say that it is real—I think it comes out of frustration. Two years ago I predicted that unless there was some reconciliation [with Ottawa], some accommodation for our position, watch out—there is going to be some trouble.
Atlantic City’s mixed fortunes 16f16g

Atlantic City’s mixed fortunes

Five years after the first glittering casino opened its doors along Atlantic City’s boardwalk, the New Jersey seaside resort city is poised to overtake Las Vegas as the gambling capital of North America. Despite lean early years, when rows of one-armed bandits stood silent and casinos suffered substantial losses, Atlantic City’s nine casinos now report enviable revenues.
How to avoid economic peril 16j17
COLUMN

How to avoid economic peril

Royal commissions are useless. They cost millions and return next to nothing. They absorb the time of our most talented thinkers for months and years and make it easier for politicians to postpone hard decisions. In fact, the presentations submitted by interested parties have been the most positive things to come out of the royal commissions.
Winning a fight for corporate survival 4647
BUSINESS

Winning a fight for corporate survival

It is a trend that has cheered corporate leaders across the country. Eleven months after the low point of the recession, corporate profits are rebounding. Economists expect that after-tax profits of Canadian corporations will increase by 45 to 55 per cent this year, after dipping to a five-year low in 1982.
A born-again blood feud 4041
WORLD

A born-again blood feud

For months, Turkish-Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash warned that he would declare the Turkish-occupied zone of Cyprus an independent state. He expressed increasing impatience over the lack of progress in talks aimed at enhancing Turkish status on the divided island.
The rustling in the curtains 7273
COLUMN

The rustling in the curtains

There is a rustling behind the curtains in Ottawa, a discernible shuffling of feet backstage. There are harrumphs and coughs and noisy clearing, of the throats; twitches and asides. Anyone wondering if Pierre Trudeau is going to go need only watch the movements and actions of his loyal underlings, all of whom want his job.
Humane society woes 56h57
JUSTICE

Humane society woes

Two months ago, in a controversial move, Toronto Mayor Arthur Eggleton agreed to appoint a oneyear interim management committee to run the strife-torn Toronto Humane Society. His decision capped a history of divisiveness that threatened to tear apart the 96-year-old organization.
November 211983 December 51983