January 16, 1984

Jackson steals the show 2425
COVER

Jackson steals the show

He has never held elective office, nor ever negotiated an international treaty. His voting base—black America—is a small racial minority, concentrated in a handful of states. Even among blacks he remains an ambivalent figure—part savior, part demagogue, strong on conception, weak on execution.
The political shape of 1984 1011
CANADA

The political shape of 1984

Whatever else 1984 may hold for Canada, one man seems certain once again to play a commanding role in determining the course of political events—and to do so in his characteristically enigmatic and unpredictable way. Last week, as politicians and political observers tried to guess the shape of the year ahead, it seemed that the man in question—Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau—was, in one important respect, stubbornly out of step with political supporters and rivals alike.
Comic visions of murder and success 5253
TELEVISION

Comic visions of murder and success

A short, slight psychiatrist sipping club soda in a bar suddenly runs amok and picks a brawl with a hockey player twice his size. The hulking pro throws a punch in self-defence, and the Caspar Milquetoast-turned-Wild Man of Borneo falls to the floor, dead.
Charting the economy’s course 3435
BUSINESS

Charting the economy’s course

The recent track record of Canada’s economic forecasters has made them seem more like novice weathermen than efficient prognosticators. Not only did they fail to foresee the recent 18-month recession but most of them grossly underestimated the strength of the recovery which began in 1983.
Why people distrust the press 89
COLUMN

Why people distrust the press

Among the most striking peculiarities of the American democracy is the impatience of our people with democratic values. It is not unusual for one party, frustrated with the point of view of another, to suggest that his antagonist depart for more compatible environs.
A general’s plans for Nigeria 1819
WORLD

A general’s plans for Nigeria

The leader of Nigeria’s smoothly executed New Year’s Eve revolution sometimes sounded more like a management consultant than a military dictator who had just seized power in Africa’s wealthiest and most populous nation. But there was no mistaking Ma.-Gen. Mohammed Bihar's message: the army meant business and would stay in power until it had purged the country of deep-seated corruption and restored its flagging economy.
Sorensen triumphs as men’s team falters 3839
SPORTS

Sorensen triumphs as men’s team falters

In an abrupt reversal of fortune, a downcast Joey Lavigne delivered a post-mortem Saturday in Laax, Switzerland, to the Canadian men’s downhill ski team following their worst showing of the season. Meanwhile, in Puy Saint Vincent, France, Gerry Sorensen picked up a glass of wine and joined her teammates on the women’s team in a victory toast.
Of bafflegab and Newspeak 5657
COLUMN

Of bafflegab and Newspeak

The Orwell industry is upon us and promises to last well into the year. There has been so much written about him that there is a vague possibility someone might actually read him. Given that unlikely prospect, one should attempt to steer the novitiate past the familiar Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm into the field in which George Orwell excelled: his essays.
Giscard’s comeback bid 67
FOLLOW-UP

Giscard’s comeback bid

In the breezy luxury of a Vail, Colo., seminar on the state of the world last summer, a reporter asked Valéry Giscard d’Estaing how he felt being out of power. With the patrician aloofness that contributed to his humiliating defeat in May, 1981, the ousted French president refused to answer.
A disunited front in Nova Scotia 4445
JUSTICE

A disunited front in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia’s 30,000-strong black community, centred mainly in Halifax County, is Canada’s largest concentration of native-born black citizens. As descendants of slaves, freedmen and Loyalists, blacks have traditionally lived in the shadows of the province’s history.
January 91984 January 231984