January 30, 1984

CANADA'S FORGOTTEN POOR 1415
COVER

CANADA'S FORGOTTEN POOR

The old woman hesitated, then she put the can of tuna fish back on the supermarket shelf. Maybe next week, when her pension cheque arrives, she will be able to afford it; until then she will make do with toast and tea. In a schoolroom a child tries to concentrate on his lesson, but his mind wanders.
In search of peace in Sweden 2425
WORLD

In search of peace in Sweden

The dispute at Stockholm’s Arlanda airport set the tone for the stormy week of East-West recrimination that followed. When Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko disembarked from his Ilyushin 62 jet for the opening of the 35-nation Conference on Security and Disarmament in Europe, Swedish customs officials accidentally seized a cache of Soviet sausage from his delegation’s luggage.
Apple’s homey new computer 3435
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Apple’s homey new computer

The public relations woman was clearly nervous. “You do not want to be insanely great,” she told Steven Jobs, the 28-year-old chairman of Apple Computer Inc., after he created the phrase on his company’s latest computer model. But Jobs was adamant and he permitted a photographer in his harborside Toronto hotel room to take his picture with the brash slogan glaring from the screen of Apple’s newly unveiled Macintosh personal computer.
Paying the penalty for weakness 67
COLUMN

Paying the penalty for weakness

CBC TV crews are in the process of filming a news special about life under the prime ministership of Pierre Trudeau. It is ready to be aired at the drop of a resignation announcement. As one of the Quebecers who had to be “in the can” by the end of last week, I have had plenty of time to dwell, not just on the Canadian economy and economic policymaking over the past 15½ years but on the economic policy directions we are taking today for the future.
The NDP’s fading fortunes 89
CANADA

The NDP’s fading fortunes

It was billed as the kickoff for a preelection campaign. New Democratic Party Leader Ed Broadbent sported a strained smile and a Florida tan as he unveiled a seven-point program aimed at boosting job security for Canadians. But, instead of the usual polite questions about his proposals, Broadbent’s press conference last week brought a barrage of inquiries about his party’s fading political fortunes.
Murder on the weekend 5253
COLUMN

Murder on the weekend

For some reason that has always escaped me, mankind views murder as one of the funniest subjects around. Agatha Christie’s heirs will forever be rich on her royalties. Murder fascinates people, as witness the paper-back rack in any airport.
An assault on the bankers’club 4041
BUSINESS WATCH

An assault on the bankers’club

Henry Newton Rowell Jackman. It’s a name you could franchise. He attended Upper Canada College and the London School of Economics; his wife, Maruja, is the talented daughter of James Duncan, the onetime potentate of Massey-Harris Co.; he presides over a fiscal fiefdom that guards assets of nearly $10 billion.
Coming clean on tax quotas 1011
CANADA

Coming clean on tax quotas

The first case was dismissed as isolated and unfortunate, the second blamed on an overzealous tax man. But under intense Conservative fire in Parliament last week, Revenue Minister Pierre Bussieres conceded what he had earlier denied—that “some” regional tax offices had improperly imposed quotas on auditors by setting revenue targets for each hour or week spent on a tax file.
The pro-life boycott 4243
PRESS

The pro-life boycott

Editors and publishers are usually pleased when controversial articles capture the public’s attention. A flood of reader mail is a good indicator that their medium is being noticed. But for the past ten months the Canadian magazine industry has been unnerved by a little-publicized campaign against Homemaker's magazine, an advertiser-supported women’s magazine that is distributed free to 1,300,000 Canadian homes.
In the wake of a golfing pioneer 4647
SPORTS

In the wake of a golfing pioneer

In 1968, when 19-year-old Sandra Post left her home in Oakville, Ont., to test the Ladies Professional Golf Association tour in the United States, only she believed that she could make a living. In total, the 34-tournament LPGA schedule offered prizes of only $550,185 (U.S.), and Post was charting a new course as the tour’s first Canadian.
January 231984 February 61984