February 6, 1984

The quest for Sarajevo gold 2627
COVER

The quest for Sarajevo gold

Next week the sleepy industrial city of Sarajevo in central Yugoslavia will become famous for more than an assassination. Since Gavrilo Princip shot Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, the Archduchess, on June 28, 1914, the city of 450,000 has been little more than a historical foot-note.
The nation puts its best feet forward 3031
COVER

The nation puts its best feet forward

The Canadian Olympic team at Sarajevo is the best the nation has ever produced. Not just a gathering of hopefuls, the athletes in red and white are internationally recognized as medal favorites in figure skating, speed skating, alpine skiing and ski jumping.
A cautious bargaining year 36b37
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

A cautious bargaining year

Proposals to create an independent forum in which unions, business and government would co-operate in battling Canada’s economic woes are decades old. But after the worst recession in 50 years, the need was urgent for a joint body designed to lessen the adversarial climate of union-management relations, which caused Canada between 1980 and 1982 to lose more manhours to work stoppages than any other Western nation.
Canada’s Olympic promise 2425
COVER

Canada’s Olympic promise

Young athletes make your heart feel good. The people around them may mess up, as did the ABC television director at Montreal in 1976 who, just before a team with the curious appellation Etats-Unis was about to enter the stadium for the opening ceremonies, went to a commercial; or as have the badgers—which is what athletes call people who wear badges and get free trips—who have bickered and fulminated about the makeup of the splendid team that will represent Canada at Sarajevo in the XIV Olympiad.
A dream fades in Quebec 1011
CANADA

A dream fades in Quebec

Premier René Lévesque once described 1982 as the worst year of his political life. He listed the patriation of the Canadian Constitution (without a Quebec veto over changes) and deterioration of the province’s economy among the serious political problems that he had struggled with that year with little success.
The new race to colonize the heavens 4647
SPACE

The new race to colonize the heavens

President Ronald Reagan made the final decision at a tense cabinet meeting last month to finance an $8-billion U.S. space station. Budget Director David Stockman argued before the wavering Reagan that the U.S. federal deficit would never go down if costly projects like the space station were approved.
The perils of the living room 8f9
COLUMN

The perils of the living room

With your new VCR, you’re going to be able to watch quality movies in the comfort of your living room for the rest of your life, or at least the rest of the warranty. You can even—gosh, you can even buy a numbered limited edition of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s 15½-hour epic, Berlin Alexanderplatz, for only $400 (U.S.). It says so right here.
Expectations unfulfilled 2020a
WORLD

Expectations unfulfilled

Two days before Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau arrived in Czechoslovakia to carry his personal peace crusade to the Eastern Bloc, an article in Prague's Večerni Praha newspaper described Canada as a huge, advanced capitalist country with two major problems.
Setting the election agenda 1819
WORLD

Setting the election agenda

Ronald Reagan delivered his 1983 State of the Union message one year ago against the backdrop of a shaky economy, high unemployment and with his own standing in the opinion polls low. But as the president’s address last week to a joint session of Congress demonstrated, 12 months can give a mighty spin to the wheel of political fortune.
Some Tory budget dreams 4243
BUSINESS WATCH

Some Tory budget dreams

Even as Marc Lalonde puts the finishing touches on what could turn out to be his last budget, chief Conservative economic thinker Michael Wilson is pondering the thrust of what he hopes will be the Mulroney government’s initial fiscal thrust.
January 301984 February 131984