June 18, 1984

The allure of the tall ships 2627
COVER

The allure of the tall ships

The tall ships slip over the horizons of a troubled world, time travellers from a near-forgotten age of grace. Their compelling charm is a rich mixture of beauty and romance tempered by their vulnerability to wind and water, the very elements they were built to exploit.
A nation’s neglected oceans 3435
COVER

A nation’s neglected oceans

Samuel Anthony, 58, stands aboard a 38-foot longliner as it rocks to the gentle, unremitting cadence of the sea in Newfoundland’s Trinity Bay. For 200 years the Anthonys of Grates Cove have been catching cod and looking to the steel-grey ocean for their survival.
The Liberals’ days of decision 1213
CANADA

The Liberals’ days of decision

Fifteen weeks after Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau announced his retirement on a snowy February morning, Liberals from across Canada gather this week in a tropical haze of tobacco smoke, tension and television lights to choose a new leader for their party and a new Prime Minister for the country.
Paralysis at the summit 1819
WORLD

Paralysis at the summit

As a working session of seven Western heads of government at the 10th Economic Summit in London broke up last week, closed-circuit television cameras suddenly caught one world leader emerging from the meetings in solitary frustration.
The challenge of the oceans 2425
COVER

The challenge of the oceans

Since the dawn of history man has ventured out on the sea in search of food, expanded knowledge or a better life on a distant shore. Modern history’s greatest explorers have been the great navigators: Columbus, Magellan, Drake, Cook and Cartier (page 33).
WHERE THE CANDIDATES STAND 1415
CANADA

WHERE THE CANDIDATES STAND

Though they were often vague on details, policy forums during the campaign forced the candidates to state their views on key issues
LETTERS 45

LETTERS

In the article A bittersweet victory (Justice, May 21), it is unfortunate that in the desire to arouse sympathy for the U.S. servicemen and their families who will manage to benefit handsomely ($250 million before 1990) from their sufferings from Agent Orange, you did not also speculate on the misery of the Vietnamese people and their families who have to endure the residual effects of Agent Orange without the generous compensation that their U.S. invaders received.
Economics on the razor’s edge 10f11
COLUMN

Economics on the razor’s edge

The leaders of the seven richest industrialized countries met last week for their annual discussion of the world’s most pressing problems. This time around it was the United States against the rest: U.S. intractability in dealing with its own federal deficit is what gives rise to high interest rates.
A treat for the eye and the ear 5657
THE ARTS

A treat for the eye and the ear

Throughout a grey, chilly May, the portents for the Toronto International Festival could not have been gloomier. Organizers of the $9.2-million extravaganza of music and dance weathered storms of criticism over elitism and overspending.
Politicians issue the fudge 6061
COLUMN

Politicians issue the fudge

Ottawa is like chocolate fudge that has melted, the instant summer descending like a layer of gauze, wilting the silly servants. Everyone thinks the Commons has already recessed, and no one is paying any attention to it. It is the last week of Pierre Trudeau’s political life, and a new insight meanders forth.
June 111984 June 251984