May 18, 1987

THE STING OF SCANDAL 2425
COVERS

THE STING OF SCANDAL

It had all the ingredients of a classic Greek tragedy—plus the titillating details of a low-grade bedroom farce. The protagonist, a man who aspired to be president of the United States, boasted qualities traditionally considered heroic: intelligence, charisma and the rhetoric of lofty idealism that promised an era of “new ideas.”
PRIVATE LIVES IN PRINT 2828a
COVER

PRIVATE LIVES IN PRINT

Admissions like that are the stuff of nightmares for journalists, and in The Miami Herald— winner of a Pulitzer Prize last month for its reporting on the Iran-contra affair—they are rare. Indeed, last week Herald publisher Richard Capen expressed no contrition when U.S. presidential hopeful Gary Hart bitterly denounced the newspaper’s allegation that he had had a weekend tryst in Washington with Miami model Donna Rice.
POLITICKS AND PRIVACY 3435
COVER

POLITICKS AND PRIVACY

We live in the Age of the Keyhole. Reporters stake out the townhouse of Gary Hart, the Democratic party front-runner, desperately hoping to catch him with a woman. The resulting headlines impugn reputations and derail a presidential bid.
Debates on the morning after 1213
CANADA

Debates on the morning after

After a constitutional break-through at Meech Lake, Que., many of Canada’s 10 premiers were in a buoyant mood last week as they returned to work in their home provinces. A beaming Don Getty received a desk-pounding ovation from the government benches when he appeared in the Alberta legislature.
A 'sad and sordid’ story 1819
WORLD

A 'sad and sordid’ story

All the theatrical elements were in place. The television lights were so bright that some participants wore dark sunglasses. Outside the marble-columned meeting hall a long line of people awaited the opening performance. And leading off was a star witness who had broken his lengthy silence to relate incredible tales of code names, disguises, encryption machines and of bungling and betrayal.
CANADA'S CRUCIBLE 3031
COVER

CANADA'S CRUCIBLE

Between 1959 and 1960 Pierre Sévigny, associate defence minister in John Diefenbaker’s Conservative cabinet, had an affair with a woman identified privately by the RCMP as a prostitute and a security risk. When Diefenbaker found out, he reprimanded Sévigny, but kept him in the cabinet.
Searching for signs of spring 2020a
WORLD

Searching for signs of spring

External Affairs Minister Joe Clark visited Poland last week to determine if Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s policy of glasnost— openness—was taking effect in that country. And Clark apparently left with positive feelings about what he saw.
Stars until the tape runs out 36b37
ANOTHER VIEW

Stars until the tape runs out

The hockey and basketball playoffs are upon us, or upon our television screens. The baseball season gathers momentum, football teams are drafting, horses are running, sports fans are in heaven and the television set never cools off. There is no time to talk about the Constitution, not a chance of watching the capital punishment debate, no interest in the latest flavors, the new books or the price of apples.
Putting out the welcome mat 8d9
COLUMN

Putting out the welcome mat

It was a swell soiree. Last week Calgary’s oil-patch elite turned out the welcome mat for possibly the richest man in Hong Kong. The guest of honor was Li Ka-shing, who on April 22 officially acquired 43 per cent of Husky Oil Ltd., Canada’s 12th-largest oil producer.
New policy, new protests 1415
CANADA

New policy, new protests

When the United Nations High Commission for Refugees awarded its prestigious Nansen Medal to Canada last autumn, it marked the first time that the prize had been given to an entire nation. But Canada’s willingness to accept refugees has led ever-greater numbers of foreigners to claim refugee status in order to gain permanent entry.
May 111987 May 251987