November 16, 1987

MOURNING A PATRIOT SON 1011
CANADA

MOURNING A PATRIOT SON

In death, as in life, René Lévesque provoked powerful emotions. Reverent tributes from colleagues and dignitaries filled special sections of newspapers last week. His old political foes admitted a profound respect for Lévesque’s untempered idealism, although a grudging few chose not to forgive the old differences.
WHAT WOMEN WANT NOW 4243
COVER

WHAT WOMEN WANT NOW

Some people say that it grew out of the civil rights movement, which convulsed the United States during the 1960s. Others regard it as only the latest skirmish in a revolution that began in 15th-century England when women unsuccessfully petitioned the king for the right to vote.
From gridiron to campaign trail 2627
WORLD

From gridiron to campaign trail

CAMPAIGN ’88 On the leaf-strewn campus of the University of New Hampshire, 58 km northeast of Manchester, a drizzle was dampening the blaze of autumn foliage to sombre shades of brown. And inside the red-brick student union, a huddle of visiting political aides looked equally glum: the rain was forcing them to cancel their game plan—an afternoon of much-needed mainstreeting.
DETERMINATION IN THE WORKPLACE 4849
COVER

DETERMINATION IN THE WORKPLACE

Droning over the frigid North Atlantic for up to 15 hours a day— often in emergencies in which a delay could result in a loss of millions of dollars—helicopter pilot Ruthanne Page delivers workers and crucial equipment to oil drilling installations 250 miles off the coast of Newfoundland.
EIGHT WHO MADE AN IMPACT 52b53
COVER

EIGHT WHO MADE AN IMPACT

They come from different backgrounds and took different paths to success. Some used politics to achieve power and influence, while others decided that they could get greater results by organizing the downtrodden. But one common thread runs through their lives:
To the brink of recession 3435
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

To the brink of recession

The panic that swept North American stock exchanges on Black Monday, Oct. 19, and during the upheavals immediately following the record-breaking crash had ebbed last week. But investors, brokers and analysts alike still found little solace in the markets and other indicators of the health of the economy.
The enduring cult of Sherlock Holmes 6060a
PUBLISHING

The enduring cult of Sherlock Holmes

When Arthur Conan Doyle sold his first novel, A Study in Scarlet, to Beeton ’s Christmas Annual—an undistinguished London journal of fiction—he scarcely intended to create a cultural icon. In 1887 he was simply a young physician with vague literary aspirations trying to occupy his abundant spare time and, perhaps, supplement his meagre income by writing mystery stories.
A MAN OF MANY PARADOXES 1415
SPECIAL REPORT

A MAN OF MANY PARADOXES

When his death was announced, many journalists who cover politics were left with a strange sense of loss. We knew him so well. Not the private man, who was always rather secretive, but the public man. For 25 years, covering Quebec politics meant covering René Lévesque—and vice versa.
Schools for all seasons S6S7
EDUCATION

Schools for all seasons

For more than a decade Los Angeles has been one of the few models for a widely discussed idea in education: keeping elementary and secondary schools open yearround. Advocates of 12-month schools say that they alleviate classroom crowding, make more efficient use of existing facilities and save money on new construction.
A clear warning to Washington T49
COLUMN

A clear warning to Washington

What does the recent stock market crash have to do with Joe Clark and the proposed freer trade deal with the Americans? Everything. In February, 1980, Canadians turfed Clark out of the prime minister’s job, in large measure because he proposed to substantially reduce the federal budget deficit by hiking gasoline taxes by 18.2 cents a gallon, or four cents a litre.
November 91987 November 231987