September 22, 1997

Canada

MANNING ON THE MOVE

Canada

Keeping the peace

Canada

War on jail guards

MANNING ON THE MOVE 1617
Canada

MANNING ON THE MOVE

The politician's son has become one of Canada's most influential figures
Keeping the peace 2627
Canada

Keeping the peace

A fractious House searches for its next referee
War on jail guards 2829
Canada

War on jail guards

Motorcycle gangs are suspected in two murders
Empire of the sons 4445
SPECIAL REPORT

Empire of the sons

A new generation is rebuilding the Reichmann family fortune
The royal future 3637
World

The royal future

After Diana, Britons take stock of their monarchy
Mining the riches of urban real estate 6061
The Nation s Business

Mining the riches of urban real estate

The God damn real estate business,” Peter Munk is telling me. “It’s a graveyard of the human ego.” Why, then, is he getting deeper and deeper into it, while taking a $535-million hit by shutting down four of his gold mines? “Why did I switch?” he shoots back.
Vancouver s air war 5051
BUSINESS

Vancouver s air war

Baton gets set to invade a $200-million TV market
The battle to right history's wrong 6667
Column

The battle to right history's wrong

Some 12,000 Canadians served during the Second World War on merchant navy ships that were a lifeline to Britain and other Allied nations fighting the Nazis. More than one out of eight died, and about 2,000 of these veterans are still alive. Some of them, like Phil Etter of Belleville, Ont.,
Canada NOTES 3233
Canada

Canada NOTES

Ottawa and the provinces settled a dispute over who will bear the cost of setting up a new national blood agency. Under the agreement reached last week during a meeting of health ministers, the federal government agreed to pay $81 million of the setup costs, estimated to be between $100 million and $150 million.
Halfway from hell 78_279
Television

Halfway from hell

A film-maker continues his inquiry into parole
PRESTON POWER 1415
Canada

PRESTON POWER

The ultimate Ottawa 'outsider' moves in
British music's déjà vu 7878_1
For The Record

British music's déjà vu

Once dismissed as hopelessly passé by anyone under 30, The Beatles are suddenly hip again. The release during the past two years oí Anthology is partly responsible for the new vogue, with many offspring of baby boomers among the millions snapping up the three double-CD sets and the eight-video package.
Opening Notes 1213

Opening Notes

For her first book, literacy advocate Arlene Perly Rae tackled a project dear to her heart: getting youngsters excited about reading. Rae asked well-known Canadians to describe the books that “woke you up or stirred your soul.” The result is Everybody’s Favourites: Canadians Talk About Books that Changed Their Lives, a de facto resource guide to some of the best in literature for children and teens (not to mention adults).
September 151997 September 291997